14
Friday
August 2020
10:49 AM IST
News Headlines
Sports Minister Rijiju to launch Fit India Freedom Run on Friday        Hoping to get the speed gun up, Starc works on muscular body during COVID lockdown        SpiceJet offers automated customer service and check-in facility on WhatsApp        Sebi issues procedure for exchanges to handle investor complaints against listed cos        Experts warn Spain is losing the 2nd round in virus fight        Bhutan imposes 1st nationwide virus lockdown        Pilot meets Gehlot, handshake signals his return        Over 3 Cr N95 masks, 1.28 Cr PPEs, 10 Cr HCQ tablets given to states, UTs by Centre for free        Bengal govt encourages organ donation: Mamata        PM unveils new tax reforms - faceless tax assessment, taxpayers' charter        Virus outbreak threatens New Zealand's fan-filled stadiums        Lahiri back in action after 5 months, joins Atwal at Wyndham        HAL s Light Combat Helicopters deployed for operations at Leh        Sensex falls over 200 pts in early trade; Nifty below 11,300        Black women, Democrats celebrate Indian-origin Senator Harris' nomination as VP        Joe Biden names Indian-American Senator Kamala Harris as running mate        Biden 'nailed this decision' in picking Harris to be his running mate: Obama        Terrorist gunned down, soldier killed in encounter in J-K's Pulwama        Mulayam Singh Yadav's condition under control: Hospital        COVID-19: 60,963 fresh cases take India's tally to 23,29,638        
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International News
TikTok to leave Hong Kong as security law raises worries
 
Hong Kong: TikTok said Tuesday it will stop operations in Hong Kong, joining other social media companies in warily eyeing ramifications of a sweeping national security law that took effect last week. The short-form video app''s planned departure from Hong Kong comes as various social media platforms and messaging apps including Facebook, WhatsApp, Telegram, Google and Twitter balk at the possibility of providing user data to Hong Kong authorities. The social media companies say they are assessing implications of the security law, which prohibits what Beijing views as secessionist, subversive or terrorist activities or as foreign intervention in the city''s internal affairs. In the communist-ruled mainland, the foreign social media platforms are blocked by China''s “Great Firewall.”

Critics see the law as Beijing''s boldest step yet to erase the legal divide between the former British colony and the mainland''s authoritarian Communist Party system. TikTok said in a statement that it had decided to halt operations “in light of recent events.” Facebook and its messaging app WhatsApp said in separate statements Monday that they would freeze the review of government requests for user data in Hong Kong, “pending further assessment of the National Security Law, including formal human rights due diligence and consultations with international human rights experts.” Hong Kong was convulsed with massive, sometimes violent anti-government protests for much of last year as the former British colony''s residents reacted to proposed extradition legislation, since withdrawn, that might have led to some suspects facing trial in mainland Chinese courts.

The new law criminalizes some pro-democracy slogans like the widely used “Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our time,” which the Hong Kong government says has separatist connotations. The fear is that it erodes the special freedoms of the semi-autonomous city, which has operated under a “one country, two systems” framework since China took control in 1997. That arrangement has allowed Hong Kong''s people freedoms not permitted in mainland China, such as unrestricted internet access and public dissent. Telegram, whose platform has been used widely to spread pro-democracy messages and information about the protests, understands “the importance of protecting the right to privacy of our Hong Kong users,” said Mike Ravdonikas, a spokesperson for the company.

“Telegram has never shared any data with the Hong Kong authorities in the past and does not intend to process any data requests related to its Hong Kong users until an international consensus is reached in relation to the ongoing political changes in the city,” he said. Twitter also paused all data and information requests from Hong Kong authorities after the law went into effect last week, the company said, emphasizing that it was “committed to protecting the people using our service and their freedom of expression.” “Like many public interest organisations, civil society leaders and entities, and industry peers, we have grave concerns regarding both the developing process and the full intention of this law,” the company said in a statement. Google likewise said it had “paused production on any new data requests from Hong Kong authorities.”

Though social platforms have yet to be blocked in Hong Kong, users have begun scrubbing their accounts and deleting pro-democracy posts out of fear of retribution. That retreat has extended to the streets: Many shops and stores that publicly stood in solidarity with protesters have removed the pro-democracy sticky notes and artwork that had adorned their walls. Under implementation rules of Article 43 of the national security law, which give the city''s police force sweeping powers in enforcing the legislation, platforms, publishers and internet service providers may be ordered to take down any electronic message published that is “likely to constitute an offence endangering national security or is likely to cause the occurrence of an offence endangering national security.”

Service providers who do not comply with such requests could face fines of up to 100,000 Hong Kong dollars ($12,903) and receive jail terms of up to six months. Individuals who post such messages may also be asked to remove the message, or face similar fines and a jail term of one year. Hong Kong authorities moved quickly to implement the law after it took effect on June 30, with police arresting about 370 people. The rules allow Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam to authorize police to intercept communications and conduct surveillance to “prevent and detect offences endangering national security.” Police can conduct searches for evidence without a warrant in “exceptional circumstances” and seek warrants requiring people suspected of violating the national security law to surrender their travel documents, preventing them from leaving Hong Kong.

Written notices or restraining orders also may be issued to freeze or confiscate property if there are “reasonable grounds” to suspect that the property is related to an offense endangering national security.


Experts warn Spain is losing the 2nd round in virus fight
Bhutan imposes 1st nationwide virus lockdown
Black women, Democrats celebrate Indian-origin Senator Harris' nomination as VP
Joe Biden names Indian-American Senator Kamala Harris as running mate
Biden 'nailed this decision' in picking Harris to be his running mate: Obama
Coronavirus breaks out again in New Zealand after 102 days
Putin says Russia develops world''s first vaccine against coronavirus
Belarus' leader wins sixth term with over 80% of votes
Malaysia's ex-finance minister charged again in graft case
Brazil makes grim milestone 100,000 deaths from COVID-19 By Marcelo de Sousa
Lebanon information minister resigns in wake of deadly blast
Leaders of Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Maldives offer condolences to families of Kerala plane crash victims
UN reports sharp increase in cybercrime during pandemic
Trump signs executive orders banning Chinese apps TikTok & Wechat
Sri Lanka election: Early results show Rajapaksa clan heading for landslide win
Lebanese Red Cross: Toll from Beirut blast rises to 100 dead
17 killed as boat capsizes in Bangladesh
Seven dead, 60 infected by new infectious disease in China: Report
Bangladesh PM Hasina assures ''proper'' probe, trial in retired army major killing
India slams Pakistan; Dismisses its ''so-called new political map'' as exercise in ''political absurdity''
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS
My whole life has been a miracle: Rajinikanth
 Mumbai: From starting out as a bus conductor to becoming one of the biggest stars of the: country,  
'Game of Thrones' star Indira Varma tests positive for coronavirus
Coronavirus: Release of Ranveer Singh-starrer '83' put on hold
'Joker' earns Joaquin Phoenix his maiden Oscar
KERALA NEWS
Toll in Idukki landslide rises to 52 as three more bodies recovered
 Idukki (Ker): The toll in the landslip in Pettimudi in the high range Idukki district rose to 52 wit
1,417 Covid cases in Kerala; 36 health workers also infected
SIT formed by Kerala police to probe air crash
Kerala logs 1,211 fresh coronavirus cases; aggregate reaches 34,331
NATIONAL NEWS
Pilot meets Gehlot, handshake signals his return
 Jaipur: Sachin Pilot met Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot Thursday, the first time after he ope
Over 3 Cr N95 masks, 1.28 Cr PPEs, 10 Cr HCQ tablets given to states, UTs by Centre for free
Bengal govt encourages organ donation: Mamata
Terrorist gunned down, soldier killed in encounter in J-K's Pulwama
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